US listed climate activist group as ‘extremists’ alongside mass killers

A group of US environmental activists engaged in non-violent civil disobedience targeting the oil industry have been listed in internal Department of Homeland Security documents as “extremists” and some of its members listed alongside white nationalists and mass killers, documents obtained by the Guardian reveal. The group have been dubbed the Valve Turners, after closingRead More

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The Backstory: Sarah McClure

Sarah McClure spent a year investigating sexual abuse in Amish communities. In “The Amish Keep to Themselves. And They’re Hiding a Horrifying Secret,” published in partnership with Cosmopolitan, McClure reveals how Amish church leaders have covered up child sexual abuse by blaming and intimidating victims. Threats of excommunication or commitment to mental-health facilities further discourageRead More

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‘Dump it down the drain’

A cacophony of machines, some as big as a dump truck, mix pharmaceutical ingredients, press them into tablets, and fill capsules at a West Virginia factory owned by generic-drug giant Mylan. By the end of each run, the walls, ceilings, floors, and nearly every nook and cranny of the intricate equipment were caked in powderyRead More

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How Amazon’s On-Site Emergency Care Endangers the Warehouse Workers it’s Supposed to Protect

Earlier this year, a falling object struck a worker’s head at an Amazon fulfillment center in Robbinsville, New Jersey. The worker visited Amcare, the company’s on-site medical unit, and told the emergency medical technicians on staff there that they had a headache and blurred vision — classic symptoms of a concussion. According to company protocol,Read More

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The Last of the Climate Deniers Hold On

Late in the summer of 1989, John Christy discovered the earth wasn’t warming. Satellites spinning through the atmosphere reported no upward trend line, and above the tropics, the University of Alabama atmospheric sciences professor and his research partner, the NASA scientist Roy Spencer, learned that the satellites had actually recorded cooling. The two men wereRead More

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Race, Crime and Surveillance

This summer, the St. Louis region made national news after more than 15 children were killed by gun violence in four months, leaving city leaders struggling to push forward preventative measures. “This is Third World living over here,” said Alderman Samuel Moore, who represents the city’s Fourth Ward in North St. Louis. “This is horribleRead More

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Marshals’ Lawlessness

As he waited to be sentenced, Garcia-Wislar became one of about 60,000 people detained each day by the U.S. Marshals Service, an arm of the Department of Justice responsible for holding people charged with federal crimes until they’re sentenced or set free. But the Marshals don’t operate their own detention centers. Instead, they have agreementsRead More

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Erasing the Dead

Since Haiti was struck by a devastating earthquake in 2010, an estimated 59,000 Haitians have been granted Temporary Protected Status, which allows the nationals of countries designated unsafe due to “extraordinary and temporary” conditions to live and work legally in the United States. But in November 2017, the Trump administration abruptly terminated TPS for Haitians,Read More

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The Backstory: Juliana Schatz Preston

Juliana Schatz Preston is an Ida B. Wells Fellow with Type Investigations. She recently finished an investigation into how parents of children with severe mental illnesses feel pressured to relinquish custody to the state so their children can receive residential treatment. Juliana’s investigation delved into how this phenomenon plays out in Connecticut, where a groupRead More

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Sexual Misconduct at Work, Again

The recent #MeToo movement has put sexual harassment at work in a spotlight. But women on Wall Street fought this same battle decades ago. There was an earlier wave of harassment allegations in the 1980s and 90s, not long after women began to enter the male-dominated world of finance. Corporate scandals led companies to implementRead More

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The Backstory: Susan Antilla

In her latest investigation, award-winning journalist Susan Antilla takes a deep-dive into how Wall Street avoids accountability after a wave of women brought harassment lawsuits two decades ago. In a launch episode of Retro Report on PBS airing today and an upcoming story published in partnership with The Intercept, Antilla investigates why so many harassmentRead More

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Waiting for Tearah

Waiting for Tearah is an intimate portrait of a mother struggling to find mental health care for her child. Shot over two years, this verité film tells the story of Shayna, a single parent of three girls, whose eldest daughter, Tearah, waits for months in a psychiatric hospital. Key Findings Many parents in the U.S. whose children suffer from mental illnessRead More

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The Perils of Private Prison Health Care

While serving a three-year sentence in an Arizona prison that contracts with a private health care company, Mariam Abdullah was known to be struggling with mental illness. Key Findings Iraqi immigrant Mariam Abdullah died by suicide at 18 in an Arizona prison; seriously mentally ill, she received only “sporadic” treatment, according to court records. PrisonRead More

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The Backstory: Lisa Armstrong

Investigative journalist Lisa Armstrong has for several years reported on solitary confinement and the treatment of mental illness in prison. In her most recent story, published in print with Huffington Post and as a documentary airing on CBS, Armstrong recounts the tragic story of a young woman, diagnosed with serious mental illness and violently sentRead More

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Calm Before the Storm

Mayor Phil Stoddard keeps enough potassium iodide on hand for all the children of South Miami. The lanky, bespectacled biology professor-cum-municipal politician fears an accident at the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station, which lies 25 miles south of downtown Miami—and a mere 20 miles from Stoddard’s office in South Miami City Hall. “Right after aRead More

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Industry Cites 3M Experiment That Exposed Cancer Patients to PFAS to Claim the Chemicals Aren’t So Bad.

Defenders of the chemicals known as PFAS have seized upon an industry-funded study of cancer patients as evidence that the compounds used to make Teflon, firefighting foam, and many other products aren’t as dangerous as they seem. The study, which was funded by the Minnesota-based global conglomerate 3M and published in February 2018 in the journal Toxicological Sciences, exposedRead More

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Crude Behavior

OAKLAND, California — She walked toward the witness stand at 8 months pregnant, her slow steps echoing in the cavernous federal courtroom. Two years earlier, she had been fired from her dream job at a Shell refinery after enduring months of harassment — sexist comments from two male supervisors, reprimands for documenting her coworkers’ mistakes,Read More

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Waste Only

The students at Westmeade Elementary School worked hard on their dragon. And it paid off. The plastic bag receptacle that the kids painted green and outfitted with triangular white teeth and a “feed me” sign won the students from the Nashville suburb first place in a recycling box decorating contest. The idea, as Westmeade’s proudRead More

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Report: IBM withdraws video surveillance product in the wake of media scrutiny

IBM appears to have withdrawn a controversial video surveillance product from the market. The surveillance industry trade website IPVM first reported on the company’s withdrawal of its intelligent video analytics product in May; reporter Charles Rollet starting poking around after IBM failed to appear at a major security and surveillance industry exhibition, attended by moreRead More

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Following Investigation, ACLU Sues U.S. Coast Guard Over Maritime Detentions

On Wednesday, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of four Jamaican fishermen alleging that the U.S. Coast Guard’s high seas drug war detentions violate domestic and international law. The ACLU lawsuit is the first to systematically challenge the Coast Guard’s high seas detention operations first exposed in a New York TimesRead More

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Toxic PFAS Chemicals Found in Maine Farms Fertilized with Sewage Sludge

All sewage sludge recently tested by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection was contaminated with PFAS chemicals, according to documents obtained by The Intercept. The state tested the sludge, solid waste that remains after the treatment of domestic and industrial water, for the presence of three “forever chemicals”: PFOA, PFOS, and PFBS. Of 44 samples taken from Maine farmsRead More

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The Backstory: Aviva Stahl

For several years investigative journalist Aviva Stahl has tracked the so-called War on Terror, surveillance, and conditions in America’s prisons. Her latest 18-month-long investigation, published today by Type Investigations in partnership with The Nation magazine, estimates thousands of incidents of force-feeding against inmates in federal prison, in violation of medical ethics and, in some cases,Read More

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Anti-Gay Discrimination, Unleashed

On Thursday the American Civil Liberties Union and Lambda Legal sued the Trump administration and the state of South Carolina over a religious exemption — one that permitted the child placement agency Miracle Hill Ministries to discriminate against prospective foster care parents based on its professed evangelical Christian beliefs. Miracle Hill had turned away plaintiffsRead More

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High Levels of Toxic PFAS Chemicals Pollute Breast Milk Around the World

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. Decades after Dupont and 3M first discovered that the perfluorinated chemicals making them fortunes could be transmitted from mothers to babies, millions of women around the world are passing dangerous amounts of these toxic compounds to their children, according to a report published on Monday. Women’s breast milk in many countries now containsRead More

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Starbucks Promised a Recyclable Drink Lid. Don’t Believe the Hype.

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. The new Starbucks coffee cup lid, which is being rolled out with great green fanfare in six cities this summer, was supposed be an environmental milestone. Starbucks promised that its latest design innovation, a “clear, recyclable” plastic drink cap that funnels liquid through a slightly raised area, would soon replace moreRead More

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The Backstory: Saki Knafo

Saki Knafo is a Type Investigations reporter who recently finished a two-year-long investigation into criminal justice in the South Bronx, explored through the character of Manny Gomez, a private investigator fighting wrongful convictions. Knafo’s reporting led to “Conviction,” a serial podcast produced in partnership with Gimlet Media, as well as a story in partnership withRead More

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New Jersey is Making Companies Pay for Toxic Contamination — Shining a New Light on a Little-Known Offender

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. New Jersey laid financial responsibility for dealing with PFAS contamination squarely at the feet of the chemical companies responsible for it. The state’s Department of Environmental Protection issued a directive on Monday ordering five companies to pay the costs of dealing with the toxic chemicals that have been associated with numerousRead More

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Still Funding Confederacy

This story originally appeared in the Richmond Free Press. On most Saturdays since 2013, volunteers have met at East End Cemetery in Henrico County to hack away at the vines and weeds that have choked gravesites there for decades. By now, they’ve hauled out tons of brush and more than 1,500 tires dumped illegally atRead More

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Right Makes Might

Since taking office, President Donald Trump has eagerly embraced foreign autocrats, portraying brutal dictators as allies to be courted and celebrated. He has backed Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, despite evidence that he ordered the gruesome murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi; praised North Korea’s Kim Jong Un as a “tough guy” with whomRead More

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The End of the City on a Hill

Last fall, in the imposing Republican Palace in Chișinău, Moldova, the capital of this small former Soviet republic wedged between Ukraine and Romania, the World Congress of Families, an American initiative that promotes “family values” worldwide, gathered under the theme “Uniting East and West.” The opening ceremonies, held in the palace’s high-ceilinged ballroom, with itsRead More

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A Desperate Bargain

Each year in America, parents of children with severe mental illness feel pressured to relinquish custody to the state so their child can receive residential treatment. Our investigation delves into how this phenomenon is playing out in Connecticut, where a group of parents have been pushing the state to stop the practice. We tell theRead More

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A Tale of Two Toxic Cities

In Willowbrook, Illinois, an affluent suburb southwest of Chicago, residents were understandably horrified when they learned that they faced an elevated risk of cancer due to air pollution. According to the EPA’s most recent National Air Toxics Assessment, released in August, the residents of seven census tracts in the Chicago suburb and the surrounding area inRead More

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Chemours is Using the U.S. as an Unregulated Dump for Europe’s Toxic GenX Waste

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. After many years of treating the developing world as its environmental dumping ground, the U.S. is finally getting a taste of what it feels like to be on the receiving end of another country’s dangerous garbage. DuPont-spinoff Chemours is sending industrial waste from the Netherlands to North Carolina. TheRead More

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Conviction

In Conviction, reporter and host Saki Knafo explores big questions about New York City’s broken criminal justice system as he follows the developing case of Pedro Hernandez, one of roughly 300,000 people arrested there each year. As a teenager, Hernandez was picked up as a suspect in a Bronx shooting and jailed on Rikers Island.Read More

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Entire Industries Are Being Blacklisted by Insurers Over #MeToo Liability

Sixteen months into #MeToo, companies seeking sexual harassment insurance are facing intense scrutiny from insurers — a trend that could put pressure on firms to institute organizational change. A recent report, authored by an insurance industry consultant, reveals new measures that insurers are taking to mitigate the risks of writing harassment policies, including decisions toRead More

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Following Exposé of Labor Violations, Centerplate Agrees to $5.45m Settlement

On Wednesday, Centerplate, a multinational food and beverage concessionaire, filed a joint motion in Northern California District Court asking a federal judge to approve a $5.45 million settlement to resolve wage and hour complaints brought by the company’s employees in California. The lawsuit, Raquedan et al v. Centerplate, alleges that Centerplate, which holds contracts withRead More

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Potential Flooding Dangers from the Border Wall Must Be Studied, San Antonio Lawmaker Says

This story originally appeared in Texas Monthly. A San Antonio lawmaker filed legislation Wednesday that would direct two state agencies to study the potential effects a border wall could have on flooding and the environment in Texas. Democratic representative Roland Gutierrez said he wanted to initiate the study after reading a Texas Monthly story (published in partnership with Type Investigations atRead More

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Broken Justice in the 42

Manuel Gomez, a private investigator who used to be a cop, lives and works alone in a one-bedroom apartment above a laundromat in the Bronx. His living room is strewn with paperwork from his cases — police reports, witness statements, a photograph of a young woman with a razor wound across her face. Reproductions ofRead More

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Expecting Care

When Arianna walked into a church basement in Austin to take a free pregnancy test, she thought of it as a lark, a way to kill time during the long, dull days of life as a street kid. About a month before, she had run away from the Austin Oaks mental health facility and wasRead More

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Surveillance and Secrets

In a dimly lit room that resembles a college lecture hall, some five St. Louis police officers stare at a wall of screens. They watch through cameras perched on stop lights or lamp posts as people cross intersections or convene at parks. Using controls at their computers, the officers can zoom in to identify people’sRead More

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Stepping Up

A clean dusting of snow coats the hoods of cars parked along Philadelphia’s West Norris Street. The trees are mostly bare, withered leaves buried in the corners of benches. This winter morning, the massive rust-brick complex, a low-rise housing development known as the James W. Johnson Homes, is serene. The complex, which stretches for blocks,Read More

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The Backstory: Justine Calma

Justine Calma is an Ida B. Wells Fellow at the Investigative Fund where she investigated abuse and neglect in California’s day programs for adults with disabilities. Calma’s piece, published in partnership with FiveThirtyEight, tells the story of a system beleaguered by inadequate funding, low wages and overwork for employees, and an oversight system that failsRead More

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Government Scientists Warned Oil Exploration Would Threaten Polar Bears

In an internal memo circulated within the Interior Department earlier this year, government scientists issued a stark warning: The Trump administration’s plans to allow oil exploration in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge could further jeopardize the region’s already fragile polar bear population. The document, authored in September by the head of the state’s US FishRead More

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Investigative Fund Relaunches with New Name

We are excited to announce that on January 15 The Investigative Fund relaunches as Type Investigations. This name change comes as part of a broader rebrand here in which our parent organization, The Nation Institute, becomes Type Media Center, and Nation Books becomes Bold Type Books. We believe Type conveys our commitment to old school journalism values — while offering usRead More

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How the Trash Industry Worked Overtime Trying to Thwart New York City’s Reform Plans

This story was originally published by ProPublica. In the summer of 2016, New York City government officials called for reforming the city’s private trash industry, calling it chaotic, dangerous and inefficient. Each night, an army of trucks races to complete long routes that crisscross the city, with dozens of companies collecting garbage from businesses inRead More

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How the Trash Industry Worked Overtime Trying to Thwart New York City’s Reform Plans

This story was originally published by ProPublica. In the summer of 2016, New York City government officials called for reforming the city’s private trash industry, calling it chaotic, dangerous and inefficient. Each night, an army of trucks races to complete long routes that crisscross the city, with dozens of companies collecting garbage from businesses inRead More

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Stepping Up

A clean dusting of snow coats the hoods of cars parked along Philadelphia’s West Norris Street. The trees are mostly bare, withered leaves buried in the corners of benches. This winter morning, the massive rust-brick complex, a low-rise housing development known as the James W. Johnson Homes, is serene. The complex, which stretches for blocks,Read More

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DuPont Has Spread Its Pollutants Around the World. Now it Wants to Filter Your Contaminated Water.

DuPont opened a factory in Saudi Arabia last week that will produce reverse osmosis water filters. The filters use ultra-thin membranes to remove water impurities, including PFAS — chemicals made and used by DuPont that have caused widespread water contamination around the world. Reverse osmosis is one of the technologies that the Environmental Protection Agency recommends forRead More

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