How Trump Created Chaos on the Border

On a weekday morning in early June, Ruben Garcia arrived at the Casa Oscar Romero building leased by Annunciation House, the hospitality center that he founded and that has served the indigent and immigrant community in El Paso, Texas, since 1978. He wore a striped button-down shirt and wire-rimmed glasses, his disheveled white hair looselyRead More

When Solitary Confinement Is A Death Sentence

Their friendship began on July 17, 2014, with whispered secrets shared through the vent in the wall that separated their cells. Jessica Burlew remembers the exact date because she’d turned 17 the day before, the same day that Mariam Abdullah, then 16 and about to be charged as an adult with armed robbery, had beenRead More

New Federal Survey to Study Harassment in Trucking Industry

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), an agency within the Department of Transportation that regulates the U.S. trucking industry, announced it will conduct a survey to study the prevalence and severity of gender and race related harassment experienced by women and minority truck drivers. In response to what FMCSA describes as “evidence, both documentaryRead More

If the Tuition Doesn’t Get You, the Cost of Student Housing Will

In 2015, Sabrina Martinez got into the University of Texas at Austin, the UT system’s flagship campus and its most selective. She was thrilled. Her parents, not so much. “They were just like ‘Nope. You can’t afford it. You shouldn’t go. Loans are ridiculous.’” They encouraged her to go to the cheaper University of TexasRead More

Industry Cites 3M Experiment That Exposed Cancer Patients to PFAS to Claim the Chemicals Aren’t So Bad.

Defenders of the chemicals known as PFAS have seized upon an industry-funded study of cancer patients as evidence that the compounds used to make Teflon, firefighting foam, and many other products aren’t as dangerous as they seem. The study, which was funded by the Minnesota-based global conglomerate 3M and published in February 2018 in the journal Toxicological Sciences, exposedRead More

Crude Behavior

OAKLAND, California — She walked toward the witness stand at 8 months pregnant, her slow steps echoing in the cavernous federal courtroom. Two years earlier, she had been fired from her dream job at a Shell refinery after enduring months of harassment — sexist comments from two male supervisors, reprimands for documenting her coworkers’ mistakes,Read More

“Worse Than a Death Sentence”

ASSAM, India — Dilip Biswas had lived in the small northeastern state of Assam for 40 years, growing rice on his land and cooking lunch at a local restaurant, when one day in 2009 the police came knocking on his door. Despite being an ethnic Bengali, a targeted minority in the state, Biswas had neverRead More

How Science Got Trampled in the Rush to Drill in the Arctic

Every year, hundreds of petroleum industry executives gather in Anchorage for the annual conference of the Alaska Oil and Gas Association, where they discuss policy and celebrate their achievements with the state’s political establishment. In May 2018, they again filed into the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center, but they had a new reason to celebrate.Read More

Waste Only

The students at Westmeade Elementary School worked hard on their dragon. And it paid off. The plastic bag receptacle that the kids painted green and outfitted with triangular white teeth and a “feed me” sign won the students from the Nashville suburb first place in a recycling box decorating contest. The idea, as Westmeade’s proudRead More

Report: IBM withdraws video surveillance product in the wake of media scrutiny

IBM appears to have withdrawn a controversial video surveillance product from the market. The surveillance industry trade website IPVM first reported on the company’s withdrawal of its intelligent video analytics product in May; reporter Charles Rollet starting poking around after IBM failed to appear at a major security and surveillance industry exhibition, attended by moreRead More

When Brokers Act Badly at Wells Fargo, Women Take the Fall

With 17 black marks posted on his record during his 12 years as a Wells Fargo broker, Marcus Debaise cost the company more than $2 million in settlements with aggrieved customers. That earned him the dubious distinction of taking first place among male brokers in an analysis of regulatory disclosures at Wells Fargo. Of his 17Read More

Teflon Toxin Safety Level Should be 700 Times Lower Than Current EPA Guideline

New data suggests that the safety threshold for PFOA in drinking water should be as low as .1 parts per trillion, according to the nation’s top toxicologist. Linda Birnbaum, director of the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, cited the figure, which is 700 times lower than the safety level set by the Environmental ProtectionRead More

Following Investigation, ACLU Sues U.S. Coast Guard Over Maritime Detentions

On Wednesday, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of four Jamaican fishermen alleging that the U.S. Coast Guard’s high seas drug war detentions violate domestic and international law. The ACLU lawsuit is the first to systematically challenge the Coast Guard’s high seas detention operations first exposed in a New York TimesRead More

Type Investigations Announces the 2019 Ida B. Wells Fellows

Type Investigations is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2019 Ida B. Wells Fellowship, whose goal is to promote diversity in journalism by helping to create a pipeline of investigative reporters of color. The fellows represent a cross-section of the U.S. and of journalism experience, ranging from emerging to mid-career journalists. Each fellow willRead More

3M Knew About PFAS Food Contamination in 2001

Last week, we learned that the Food and Drug Administration had detected PFAS compounds in pineapple, sweet potato, meat, and chocolate cake. The presence of the industrial compounds in our food was made public by the Environmental Working Group after a staff member of the Environmental Defense Fund took photos of the research at a scientific conference in Europe. WhileRead More

Toxic PFAS Chemicals Found in Maine Farms Fertilized with Sewage Sludge

All sewage sludge recently tested by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection was contaminated with PFAS chemicals, according to documents obtained by The Intercept. The state tested the sludge, solid waste that remains after the treatment of domestic and industrial water, for the presence of three “forever chemicals”: PFOA, PFOS, and PFBS. Of 44 samples taken from Maine farmsRead More

The Backstory: Aviva Stahl

For several years investigative journalist Aviva Stahl has tracked the so-called War on Terror, surveillance, and conditions in America’s prisons. Her latest 18-month-long investigation, published today by Type Investigations in partnership with The Nation magazine, estimates thousands of incidents of force-feeding against inmates in federal prison, in violation of medical ethics and, in some cases,Read More

Wall Street Goes Silent on #MeToo

A woman who is sexually harassed at work is six and a half times more likely to change jobs than a woman who is not. So you might think that, a year and a half into the #MeToo movement, sexual harassment would be a front-burner issue for the people paid to diversify Wall Street. Yet atRead More

An American Black Site

It was November 11, 2015, and Mohammad Salameh hadn’t eaten in 34 days. The morning was stretching toward noon, and he was lying on a concrete platform that served as his bed when a team of guards dressed in riot gear appeared at his cell door and ordered him to cuff up. A week earlier,Read More

Anti-Gay Discrimination, Unleashed

On Thursday the American Civil Liberties Union and Lambda Legal sued the Trump administration and the state of South Carolina over a religious exemption — one that permitted the child placement agency Miracle Hill Ministries to discriminate against prospective foster care parents based on its professed evangelical Christian beliefs. Miracle Hill had turned away plaintiffsRead More

Air Pollution Crisis Exposes More Environmental Racism in Illinois

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. Wendy Abrams has used her wealth to help protect the environment and public health. She’s the founder of a public art exhibit meant to raise awareness on climate change, and she serves on the boards of NRDC Action Fund and the Waterkeeper Alliance, and has been on theRead More

Brazil’s Pesticide Industry is Creating Massive PFOS Contamination

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. While much of the world struggles to clean up contamination from the toxic industrial compound PFOS, Brazil is still adding to the massive environmental mess with its large-scale production, use, and export of sulfluramid, a pesticide that degrades into PFOS. Linked to low birth weight, weakened immune response,Read More

High Levels of Toxic PFAS Chemicals Pollute Breast Milk Around the World

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. Decades after Dupont and 3M first discovered that the perfluorinated chemicals making them fortunes could be transmitted from mothers to babies, millions of women around the world are passing dangerous amounts of these toxic compounds to their children, according to a report published on Monday. Women’s breast milk in many countries now containsRead More

A Search for Answers. A Search for Blame.

Max Eden didn’t even want to read about Parkland. He saw the news on Valentine’s Day, after a dinner date with his girlfriend at a little French place in Washington, D.C., taking an Uber home. There was the gut-punch—“oh shit, another school shooting”—then the queasy afterthought that none of this hits as hard as itRead More

Starbucks Promised a Recyclable Drink Lid. Don’t Believe the Hype.

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. The new Starbucks coffee cup lid, which is being rolled out with great green fanfare in six cities this summer, was supposed be an environmental milestone. Starbucks promised that its latest design innovation, a “clear, recyclable” plastic drink cap that funnels liquid through a slightly raised area, would soon replace moreRead More

A Former Oil-Industry Lobbyist Is Now In Charge of America’s Public Lands

This story originally appeared in The Nation. It’s been a rough couple of months for David Bernhardt. Since his nomination to serve as Interior secretary in early February, the former oil-industry lawyer and lobbyist has been dogged by a growing list of scandals surrounding his tenure at the Department. Bernhardt, who was supposed to cleanRead More

The Backstory: Saki Knafo

Saki Knafo is a Type Investigations reporter who recently finished a two-year-long investigation into criminal justice in the South Bronx, explored through the character of Manny Gomez, a private investigator fighting wrongful convictions. Knafo’s reporting led to “Conviction,” a serial podcast produced in partnership with Gimlet Media, as well as a story in partnership withRead More

New Jersey is Making Companies Pay for Toxic Contamination — Shining a New Light on a Little-Known Offender

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. New Jersey laid financial responsibility for dealing with PFAS contamination squarely at the feet of the chemical companies responsible for it. The state’s Department of Environmental Protection issued a directive on Monday ordering five companies to pay the costs of dealing with the toxic chemicals that have been associated with numerousRead More

Still Funding Confederacy

This story originally appeared in the Richmond Free Press. On most Saturdays since 2013, volunteers have met at East End Cemetery in Henrico County to hack away at the vines and weeds that have choked gravesites there for decades. By now, they’ve hauled out tons of brush and more than 1,500 tires dumped illegally atRead More

Right Makes Might

Since taking office, President Donald Trump has eagerly embraced foreign autocrats, portraying brutal dictators as allies to be courted and celebrated. He has backed Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, despite evidence that he ordered the gruesome murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi; praised North Korea’s Kim Jong Un as a “tough guy” with whomRead More

Inside the Surveillance Program IBM Built for Rodrigo Duterte

Jaypee Larosa was standing in front of an internet cafe in Davao City, a metropolitan hub on the Philippine island of Mindanao, when three men in dark jackets pulled up on a motorcycle and opened fire. That summer evening, Larosa, 20, was killed. After the shooting, according to witnesses, one of the men reportedly removedRead More

States Crack Down on Broker Abuse as the SEC Dithers

Less than two weeks after a new Democratic majority took office in the New York state Senate, legislators introduced the Investment Transparency Act, a bill seeking to protect ordinary investors from aggressive salespeople in the financial industry. The legislation, if it passes, would require brokers to tell their clients point blank, “I am not aRead More

The End of the City on a Hill

Last fall, in the imposing Republican Palace in Chișinău, Moldova, the capital of this small former Soviet republic wedged between Ukraine and Romania, the World Congress of Families, an American initiative that promotes “family values” worldwide, gathered under the theme “Uniting East and West.” The opening ceremonies, held in the palace’s high-ceilinged ballroom, with itsRead More

The Hidden Battle Threatening the Future of America’s Wild Places

The La Sal Mountains rise like ungainly totems above the red rock desert outside Moab, Utah. From afar the forested slopes and barren, rock-strewn peaks have none of the splendor of nearby Arches or Canyonlands National Parks, which together attract millions of visitors every year. Nor are they particularly easy to get to. Until recently thereRead More

A Desperate Bargain

Each year in America, parents of children with severe mental illness feel pressured to relinquish custody to the state so their child can receive residential treatment. Our investigation delves into how this phenomenon is playing out in Connecticut, where a group of parents have been pushing the state to stop the practice. We tell theRead More

Park Ranger Sues Department of Interior for Discrimination

A high-ranking park ranger has sued for discrimination, claiming that National Park Service officials have twice chosen less qualified men over her for open positions. Fifteen-year department veteran Michelle Schonzeit filed suit against the head of the Department of the Interior, the parent agency of the National Park Service, in D.C. federal court in December.Read More

A Tale of Two Toxic Cities

In Willowbrook, Illinois, an affluent suburb southwest of Chicago, residents were understandably horrified when they learned that they faced an elevated risk of cancer due to air pollution. According to the EPA’s most recent National Air Toxics Assessment, released in August, the residents of seven census tracts in the Chicago suburb and the surrounding area inRead More

Inside the Secretive US Air Campaign In Somalia

Halimo Mohamed Abdi said the blast broke both her hips, left shrapnel embedded in her thigh, and caused terrible burns that cost her both breasts. Before she lost consciousness, she told me, she saw three boys—ages 9, 10, and 16—die in the explosion, which occurred at night in a field outside Bariire, a village 30Read More

Chemours is Using the U.S. as an Unregulated Dump for Europe’s Toxic GenX Waste

This story originally appeared in The Intercept. After many years of treating the developing world as its environmental dumping ground, the U.S. is finally getting a taste of what it feels like to be on the receiving end of another country’s dangerous garbage. DuPont-spinoff Chemours is sending industrial waste from the Netherlands to North Carolina. TheRead More

Conviction

In Conviction, reporter and host Saki Knafo explores big questions about New York City’s broken criminal justice system as he follows the developing case of Pedro Hernandez, one of roughly 300,000 people arrested there each year. As a teenager, Hernandez was picked up as a suspect in a Bronx shooting and jailed on Rikers Island.Read More

Entire Industries Are Being Blacklisted by Insurers Over #MeToo Liability

Sixteen months into #MeToo, companies seeking sexual harassment insurance are facing intense scrutiny from insurers — a trend that could put pressure on firms to institute organizational change. A recent report, authored by an insurance industry consultant, reveals new measures that insurers are taking to mitigate the risks of writing harassment policies, including decisions toRead More

Following Exposé of Labor Violations, Centerplate Agrees to $5.45m Settlement

On Wednesday, Centerplate, a multinational food and beverage concessionaire, filed a joint motion in Northern California District Court asking a federal judge to approve a $5.45 million settlement to resolve wage and hour complaints brought by the company’s employees in California. The lawsuit, Raquedan et al v. Centerplate, alleges that Centerplate, which holds contracts withRead More

Some Doctors Are Standing by Discontinued Contraceptive Device

The permanent contraceptive Essure went off sale December 31—a relief to the activists known as “E-Sisters,” who came together around symptoms they linked to the device via a Facebook group called Essure Problems in 2011 and celebrated with New Year’s Eve online toasts. The controversial product won’t soon be forgotten for the thousands of womenRead More

Aldermen debate grassroots-led bill on surveillance technology

This story originally appeared in The St. Louis American. There’s a surveillance camera at corner of Arsenal Street and S. Grand Boulevard, and it appears to be pointed at MoKaBe’s Coffeehouse, where Black Lives Matter activists and other human rights protestors are known to meet, said Kendra Tatum, an organizer with Organization for Black Struggle. “WeRead More

Bringing Coast Guard Secrecy to Court

In 2017 and 2018, I exposed a little known practice by the U.S. Coast Guard of detaining suspected drug traffickers aboard cutters and holding them incommunicado for weeks or even months. In a pair of stories for The New York Times Magazine and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, I found that many of these detainees remainedRead More

Potential Flooding Dangers from the Border Wall Must Be Studied, San Antonio Lawmaker Says

This story originally appeared in Texas Monthly. A San Antonio lawmaker filed legislation Wednesday that would direct two state agencies to study the potential effects a border wall could have on flooding and the environment in Texas. Democratic representative Roland Gutierrez said he wanted to initiate the study after reading a Texas Monthly story (published in partnership with Type Investigations atRead More

Broken Justice in the 42

Manuel Gomez, a private investigator who used to be a cop, lives and works alone in a one-bedroom apartment above a laundromat in the Bronx. His living room is strewn with paperwork from his cases — police reports, witness statements, a photograph of a young woman with a razor wound across her face. Reproductions ofRead More

Expecting Care

When Arianna walked into a church basement in Austin to take a free pregnancy test, she thought of it as a lark, a way to kill time during the long, dull days of life as a street kid. About a month before, she had run away from the Austin Oaks mental health facility and wasRead More

Surveillance and Secrets

In a dimly lit room that resembles a college lecture hall, some five St. Louis police officers stare at a wall of screens. They watch through cameras perched on stop lights or lamp posts as people cross intersections or convene at parks. Using controls at their computers, the officers can zoom in to identify people’sRead More

Trump’s Border Wall Would Destroy Historic Gravesites in Texas

Ramiro R. Ramírez remembers his grandmother, when he was a young child, planting a red rose bush to mark the gravesite of Nathaniel Jackson, his great-great grandfather. With time, the rose bush vanished, like the wooden cross marking Jackson’s death in 1865. But Jackson’s legacy was not forgotten, nor that of his wife Matilda Hicks,Read More

FBI Kept Files on Peaceful Climate Change Protesters

On 15 May 2016 three friends from Fairfield, Iowa, made the five-hour drive to an oil refinery on the shores of Lake Michigan to participate in what was part of a series of protests and acts of civil disobedience in the fight against climate change. They had every intention of getting arrested. What they didn’tRead More

The Backstory: Justine Calma

Justine Calma is an Ida B. Wells Fellow at the Investigative Fund where she investigated abuse and neglect in California’s day programs for adults with disabilities. Calma’s piece, published in partnership with FiveThirtyEight, tells the story of a system beleaguered by inadequate funding, low wages and overwork for employees, and an oversight system that failsRead More

Government Scientists Warned Oil Exploration Would Threaten Polar Bears

In an internal memo circulated within the Interior Department earlier this year, government scientists issued a stark warning: The Trump administration’s plans to allow oil exploration in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge could further jeopardize the region’s already fragile polar bear population. The document, authored in September by the head of the state’s US FishRead More

How One Company Is Making Millions Off Trump’s War on the Poor

One night last March, Sue Fredericks ran into trouble. She had been watching snow accumulate for hours from her post at a 24-hour gas station. Busy stretches on her overnight shift were rare, on account of the size of the town in which she worked; with a few thousand residents an hour from Indianapolis, itRead More

Stepping Up

A clean dusting of snow coats the hoods of cars parked along Philadelphia’s West Norris Street. The trees are mostly bare, withered leaves buried in the corners of benches. This winter morning, the massive rust-brick complex, a low-rise housing development known as the James W. Johnson Homes, is serene. The complex, which stretches for blocks,Read More

Investigative Fund Relaunches with New Name

We are excited to announce that on January 15 The Investigative Fund relaunches as Type Investigations. This name change comes as part of a broader rebrand here in which our parent organization, The Nation Institute, becomes Type Media Center, and Nation Books becomes Bold Type Books. We believe Type conveys our commitment to old school journalism values — while offering usRead More

Is Denaturalization the Next Front in Trump’s War on Immigration?

On the morning of June 2, 2017, Odette Dureland woke to a loud knock on the door of the one-story bungalow that she shares with her husband and her children. She was recovering from minor surgery, so her 26-year-old daughter, Rebecca, rose to open the door. Outside, there was a group of federal agents fromRead More

Private Construction-Waste Truck Hits Man Outside de Blasio Event

This story was originally published by ProPublica. A private construction-waste truck struck and injured a pedestrian in Manhattan on Tuesday morning, the second crash for the vehicle’s owner in 2018. The crash occurred outside an event in Chinatown attended by Mayor Bill de Blasio, and a member of his security detail helped the injured pedestrianRead More

Private Construction-Waste Truck Hits Man Outside de Blasio Event

This story was originally published by ProPublica. A private construction-waste truck struck and injured a pedestrian in Manhattan on Tuesday morning, the second crash for the vehicle’s owner in 2018. The crash occurred outside an event in Chinatown attended by Mayor Bill de Blasio, and a member of his security detail helped the injured pedestrian inRead More

Is Denaturalization the Next Front in Trump’s War on Immigration?

On the morning of June 2, 2017, Odette Dureland woke to a loud knock on the door of the one-story bungalow that she shares with her husband and her children. She was recovering from minor surgery, so her 26-year-old daughter, Rebecca, rose to open the door. Outside, there was a group of federal agents fromRead More

How One Company Is Making Millions Off Trump’s War on the Poor

One night last March, Sue Fredericks ran into trouble. She had been watching snow accumulate for hours from her post at a 24-hour gas station. Busy stretches on her overnight shift were rare, on account of the size of the town in which she worked; with a few thousand residents an hour from Indianapolis, it isRead More

Stepping Up

A clean dusting of snow coats the hoods of cars parked along Philadelphia’s West Norris Street. The trees are mostly bare, withered leaves buried in the corners of benches. This winter morning, the massive rust-brick complex, a low-rise housing development known as the James W. Johnson Homes, is serene. The complex, which stretches for blocks,Read More

FBI Kept Files on Peaceful Climate Change Protesters

On 15 May 2016 three friends from Fairfield, Iowa, made the five-hour drive to an oil refinery on the shores of Lake Michigan to participate in what was part of a series of protests and acts of civil disobedience in the fight against climate change. They had every intention of getting arrested. What they didn’t expectRead More

The Backstory: Justine Calma

Justine Calma is an Ida B. Wells Fellow at the Investigative Fund where she investigated abuse and neglect in California’s day programs for adults with disabilities. Calma’s piece, published in partnership with FiveThirtyEight, tells the story of a system beleaguered by inadequate funding, low wages and overwork for employees, and an oversight system that fails too many vulnerable adultsRead More

Is California Failing Its Most Vulnerable Adults?

As she waited for her meal during a routine trip to a fast-food restaurant in Northern California’s Bay Area in July of last year, a woman with a developmental disability was lured away from her adult day care group. The staffer overseeing the group ordered food, but it wasn’t until after he ordered that heRead More

Government Scientists Warned Oil Exploration Would Threaten Polar Bears

In an internal memo circulated within the Interior Department earlier this year, government scientists issued a stark warning: The Trump administration’s plans to allow oil exploration in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge could further jeopardize the region’s already fragile polar bear population. The document, authored in September by the head of the state’s US FishRead More

Monumental Lies

Dozens of kids mill around a sprawling field of grass, on a warm, fall day in Biloxi, Mississippi. They stare up at a man in his sixties, who is dressed in 19th-century clothing. There’s a table heaped with relics from the Civil War — satchels, binoculars, saddles, guns. And other adults, dressed in Civil WarRead More

EPA’s New Water Rule Will Gut The Clean Water Act

A new water rule will greatly reduce federal water protections, imperiling drinking water, endangered species, and ecosystems across the country. According to the rule that the Environmental Protection Agency is expected to release next week — some details of which were leaked Thursday — streams that are dependent on rainfall and wetlands not physically connected to year-roundRead More

Trump’s Attack on the Clean Water Act Will Fuel Destructive Pipeline Boom

A new water rule that will strip federal protections from an estimated 60-90 percent of U.S. waterways will dramatically ease restrictions on how polluting industries do business. According to the rule, which is due out next week, streams that don’t run year-round and many wetlands will no longer be subject to the Clean Water Act. As aRead More

EPA Plans to Roll Back Water Protections Despite Climate Change Warnings

While one branch of the U.S. government issued a report last week outlining the grave threats posed by climate change, another branch was preparing a rollback of water protections that will further exacerbate some of the climate-related problems laid out in the report. “Water security in the United States is increasingly in jeopardy” warn theRead More

PFOA and PFOS Cause Lower Sperm Counts and Smaller Penises

There’s a new reason to be concerned about toxic chemicals used in nonstick pans, waterproof products, and firefighting foam: PFOA and PFOS impair male reproductive health, according to a study released in early November. Researchers have already documented that PFOA and PFOS, two compounds in a class known as PFAS, reduce the fertility of male mice, rats, andRead More

New Legislation Seeks to Fix New York City’s Language Access Woes

For years, the Arab-American community in New York City has fought for language access in elections. Now, city lawmakers want to take down one language barrier by providing interpreters across select election districts. At a press conference Tuesday, New York City council member Justin Brannan announced legislation mandating that the city’s Voter Assistance Advisory CommitteeRead More

The Costs of the Confederacy

With centuries-old trees, manicured lawns, a tidy cemetery and a babbling brook, the Jefferson Davis Home and Presidential Library is a marvelously peaceful, green oasis amid the garish casinos, T-shirt shops and other tourist traps on Highway 90 in Biloxi, Mississippi. One gray October morning, about 650 local schoolchildren on a field trip to Beauvoir,Read More

Tech Firms Ended Mandatory Arbitration for Sexual Harassment Claims

Employment activists have railed against mandatory arbitration for decades, to little avail. But the #MeToo movement put a spotlight on the downsides of mandatory arbitration of sexual harassment and assault claims, and technology companies have begun responding. Seven days after the November 1 walkout of 20,000 Google workers across the globe, outraged over a New York Times investigation ofRead More

The Occupation

The blue and white chopper dipped low over the old white farmhouse and the muddy green river. Seventy-three-year-old Reynaldo Anzaldua, sporting a tan Vietnam vet baseball cap, squinted up at the chopper blotting out the blue sky. “Border Patrol, ver…” he said, the whir of the rotor blades drowning out his words. Anzaldua waited a bit,Read More

Arizona’s Long Road to Make Elections Accessible

It took nearly a week after Election Day for the Senate race in Arizona between Martha McSally, R, and Kyrsten Sinema, D, to finally be called. Sinema emerged the winner, narrowing the Republicans’ hold on the Senate. The close call highlighted the importance of voters getting to the polls: On Nov. 20, the margin was aRead More

The Vanishing

On a Friday afternoon in the fall of 2017, a few months after the liberation of Mosul from the Islamic State, a group of neighbors gathered at Mar Mattai, a monastery founded in the fourth century. They unloaded baskets of food, and arranged themselves around a long table in a courtyard. A woman named NiserRead More

Humanitarian Crises in DRC Leaves Millions of Children in Danger

The men came screaming out of the darkness, some firing AK-47s, most wielding bows and arrows or razor-sharp machetes. They had laid waste to a nearby village hours earlier and were now doing the same to Tche, a rural community in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The terrible, undulating war whoopsRead More

The Interior Department Is Sidelining Environmental Justice

New Mexico’s San Juan county is no stranger to the unequal impacts of resource extraction. The residents of this arid region in the north western corner of the state, once declared an “energy sacrifice zone,” have lived with the legacy of energy development for decades, from uranium mining during the height of the Cold WarRead More

Across the Country, Voters With Limited English Faced Obstacles

About 49 percent of the 235 million eligible voters in the United States cast ballots in the midterm elections, which produced important wins for Democrats across the country. One of the more surprising Democratic victories was in New York’s 11th Congressional District, which includes Staten Island and parts of southern Brooklyn. There, a Republican incumbent expected to win byRead More

A Border Wall Could Cause Deadly Flooding. Officials Plan to Build It Anyway

On July 12, 2008, in the border town of Nogales, Arizona, the afternoon turned from sun-drenched to ominously dark in a matter of minutes. A summer monsoon is typically a welcome respite in the desert heat, but the approaching storm quickly became violent. Rising waters began creeping into downtown businesses. The public library was inundated.Read More

Limited English Proficiency Voters Could Help Determine Congress

As Americans go to the polls tomorrow, one group of people will have a harder time of it than most. They are the 5.78 million eligible voters who have Limited English Proficiency (LEP) and who do not receive federal language accommodations with voting. LEP voters may speak some English, but can’t speak, read, or writeRead More

How the ADA could affect Native American voters

Donna Semans pulled over at a food cart near a watermelon stand on a dusty turnout to ask directions. She ordered a snowcone topped with diced pickles and powdered Koolaid, a specialty to the Navajo Nation known as a piccadilly. “Not bad,” Semans said, plastic spoon in hand. “When you’re on the road, a pickleRead More

Nearly $3M in LLC Campaign Donations Since the NY Primary

The lightly regulated machine of LLC campaign donations has continued to pump funds to New York state candidates and political action committees, with at least $2.9 million flowing just since the September 13 primary. That’s in addition to the $10.8 million in LLC giving earlier in 2018 and the $42 million LLCs gave in 2015-2017.Read More

Wall Street Moves to Gut Post-Crisis Financial Rules

On the campaign trail, Donald Trump frequently pledged to “dismantle” the Dodd-Frank financial reforms passed in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. On Wednesday, with the Federal Reserve’s release of a proposal to roll back capital and liquidity requirements, he caught his big whale. Those requirements, imposed by the Dodd-Frank Act, were put in place to ensureRead More

EPA Continues To Approve Toxic PFAS Chemicals Despite Widespread Contamination

Even as the Environmental Protection Agency has been trumpeting its efforts to find and clean up contamination from industrial chemicals known as PFAS, it has been allowing new chemicals in this class to enter into commerce, according to data from the agency. The EPA has allowed more than 100 new PFAS compounds to be made and imported in largeRead More

Border Patrol Union Endorses Extremist Video

The National Border Patrol Council, the union representing Border Patrol agents across the country, is featured in a new video that includes white nationalists and anti-Muslim extremists. The video, titled “Killing Free Speech,” was endorsed by the union and recently shown by agents at a private screening in San Diego. The video is also expected to be shownRead More

A Giant Pile of Money

This is part 1 in a 3-part series. Read part 2 and part 3. A Wall Street Coup Thousands of Kentucky public school teachers swarmed the state Capitol earlier this year, angry not about low salaries, but about their shrinking pensions. Among their concerns: the high portion of their money that has ended up in the hands of WallRead More